Viewpoint

25 May 2016

Data Center Interconnect is driving optical innovation. Component suppliers and systems vendors are racing to offer the highest data rate, longest reach and least expensive optics for use within and between data centers. The innovation in speed, packaging, digital signal processing and systems is enabling new applications for data center operators. This article describes some of the innovative ways data centers are using these new options in optical transport for data center interconnect.

10 March 2016

A new and welcome trend that has emerged sees utility companies using their existing infrastructure and pre-existing utility ducts in innovative ways to provide customer connections. This trend is obviously driven by the desire to eliminate the cost of installation, which can ultimately make or break any FTTH project…

1 March 2016

Modern high bit rate optical communication channels now use polarization, amplitude and phase of the optical carrier to encode digital information. The future of optical communication requires Optical Arbitrary Waveform Generation (O-AWG). The ability to produce any kind of optical waveform, through the use of an optical modulator and an electrical AWG requires better accuracy and reliability than ever before. O-AWG’s require full control of an optical modulator, including the ability to bias at any arbitrary point on the modulator's electrical-to-optical transfer functions. The needs of the research and development community are ever changing and a truly arbitrary O-AWG will be as necessary to the optical R&D engineer as is the electrical AWG is for the RF engineer.

2 October 2015

Service providers are moving towards mesh-based transport networks, and the latest technological advance is the standards-based Shared Mesh Protection, which leverages an intelligent GMPLS control plane so a meshed transport network can recover from multiple local and network-wide failures while lowering costs by avoiding the need to dedicate backup bandwidth for every active circuit. This article will examine hardware-accelerated Shared Mesh Protection as a means of increasing the network resiliency without incurring additional fiber-related expenses.

Pages

Feature

Cost and compatibility can make a compelling case for pushing 100Gb/s bandwidth over a single optical channel, both as individual links and supporting 400Gb/s Ethernet, finds Andy Extance

Analysis and opinion
Analysis and opinion
Feature

Robin Mersh takes a look at how the industry is creating next-generation optical access fit for 5G

Feature

Technological advances to aid the increasing demand for bandwidth, on the path towards the terabit network, should lead to optical signals that are flexible and adaptive, like water, argues Dr Maxim Kuschnerov and Dr Yin Wang