Fibre Systems Spring 2015

FEATURE

The many paths of Asian fibre

 

Ever since the emergence of fibre-to-the-home (FTTH) in the early 2000s, the world has looked towards Asia for leadership. To be perfectly fair, it hasn’t exactly found the encouragement it was looking for and ultimately the early Asian examples haven’t inspired copycat deployment elsewhere. But there is a new wave of Asian fibre deployments – both in developed and in emerging markets – that may well inspire other nations as we move forward.

FEATURE

Self-service bandwidth

No self-respecting optical equipment vendor can afford to be without a well-considered strategy for software defined networking (SDN). Over the last 18 months or so, most of the major and second-tier vendors have announced how they intend to approach software control of the optical layer in carrier transport networks – which we will call transport SDN to distinguish it from the more well-developed application of SDN in data centre network environments.

FEATURE

Search engines of change

It’s getting ever harder to remember what the world was like before Google and Facebook. Not only do what many people think of as simply websites play big roles in our daily lives, they also shape the physical structure of the Internet itself. And in doing so, they present both opportunities and threats to the rest of the networking industry.

FEATURE

Cable conundrum

Cable operators are used to having the upper hand when it comes to delivering entertainment services to consumers. But as demand for high-speed broadband surges and telecom operators expand into Internet protocol television (IPTV), cable operators must invest in their networks or face losing subscribers to other service providers.

Feature

Cost and compatibility can make a compelling case for pushing 100Gb/s bandwidth over a single optical channel, both as individual links and supporting 400Gb/s Ethernet, finds Andy Extance

Analysis and opinion
Analysis and opinion
Feature

Robin Mersh takes a look at how the industry is creating next-generation optical access fit for 5G

Feature

Technological advances to aid the increasing demand for bandwidth, on the path towards the terabit network, should lead to optical signals that are flexible and adaptive, like water, argues Dr Maxim Kuschnerov and Dr Yin Wang