Fibre to the home

FEATURE

The many paths of Asian fibre

 

Ever since the emergence of fibre-to-the-home (FTTH) in the early 2000s, the world has looked towards Asia for leadership. To be perfectly fair, it hasn’t exactly found the encouragement it was looking for and ultimately the early Asian examples haven’t inspired copycat deployment elsewhere. But there is a new wave of Asian fibre deployments – both in developed and in emerging markets – that may well inspire other nations as we move forward.

FEATURE

Programming the network

Carriers are exploring a fundamental change to how they manage and operate their networks.

Distributed routing protocols that enable connectionless packet-based networking have long been the norm for carrier traffic. Now operators are exploring the idea of a central control instead of sprinkling intelligence across the equipment in their networks.

FEATURE

Five common FTTH myths debunked

Thomas J. Watson, chairman and CEO of IBM, famously said: ‘There is a world market for about five computers’. While this statement would have been accurate at the time (1943), viewed through the lens of history it seems rather silly. In any case, the statement is probably apocryphal. There is no record that Watson ever said anything of the sort.

Feature

Six months after it became mandatory for copper and fibre cables supplied to EU/EEA member states to comply with the Construction Product Regulation and carry CE marking, Keely Portway asks what, if any, effect this has had on cable suppliers

Feature

To continue growing data traffic, optical scientists are tackling tough questions about nonlinear effects in optical fibre, discovers Andy Extance 

Feature

January of this year saw Jerry Rawls step down as chief executive of Finisar, a company he had grown from obscurity to worldwide success. He talks to Rebecca Pool about building his empire, the firm’s new CEO and a future that could include Oclaro*