NETWORK SECURITY

FEATURE

How to quantum secure optical networks

The introduction of large-scale quantum computers would render almost all currently used key-exchange protocols useless. For optical fibre networks, quantum key distribution (QKD) seems to be the natural answer to this challenge, but it too has its limitations. On the other hand, there are alternatives that potentially could provide a relatively seamless replacement to current key-exchange algorithms.

FEATURE

A quantum of security

If you think practical quantum computers arriving within 5-10 years means you don’t need to worry about their impact on communication network security yet, you’re in for a nasty surprise. That’s according to Jane Melia, vice president of strategic business development at Canberra, Australia-headquartered quantum security system vendor QuintessenceLabs. Adopting new security technology takes at least two years, and that protection must often continue for more than five years, so ‘this deadline is actually very close indeed’, she warns.

FEATURE

Securing the cloud networking supernova

Cloud services have burst upon us like a supernova, simultaneously expanding and changing network traffic patterns. The light of a supernova is also a metaphor for freedom. Like clouds floating in the sky, the internet cloud frees users from old restraints. Business users and individuals can access cloud computing and applications on-demand, at any time, from anywhere, for as much as they want and as long as they want, and pay only for what they use. It also frees IT departments from maintaining a physical infrastructure and dealing with software updates and bug fixes.

Feature

Cost and compatibility can make a compelling case for pushing 100Gb/s bandwidth over a single optical channel, both as individual links and supporting 400Gb/s Ethernet, finds Andy Extance

Analysis and opinion
Analysis and opinion
Feature

Robin Mersh takes a look at how the industry is creating next-generation optical access fit for 5G

Feature

Technological advances to aid the increasing demand for bandwidth, on the path towards the terabit network, should lead to optical signals that are flexible and adaptive, like water, argues Dr Maxim Kuschnerov and Dr Yin Wang