Networks

FEATURE

Submarine cables know no boundaries

When the world’s first transatlantic cable failed in 1858 – just three weeks after it had been inaugurated with a congratulatory telegram from Queen Victoria to US President James Buchanan – it took eight years until a replacement was operational. The cable, made of copper wires insulated with natural latex from the gutta-percha tree, probably had manufacturing faults and burnt out when its electric load was cranked up to compensate for rapidly deteriorating signal strength.

Feature

Cost and compatibility can make a compelling case for pushing 100Gb/s bandwidth over a single optical channel, both as individual links and supporting 400Gb/s Ethernet, finds Andy Extance

Analysis and opinion
Analysis and opinion
Feature

Robin Mersh takes a look at how the industry is creating next-generation optical access fit for 5G

Feature

Technological advances to aid the increasing demand for bandwidth, on the path towards the terabit network, should lead to optical signals that are flexible and adaptive, like water, argues Dr Maxim Kuschnerov and Dr Yin Wang