Resources

White paper
04 September 2014

This technical paper provides an overview of the most dominant networking and storage applications in modern data centers. Additionally, it functions as an application reference book for network cabling designers in data centers by offering information about the different structured cabling infrastructures capable of running these applications.

White paper
20 August 2014

In order to meet the constantly increasing need for bandwidth, more and more telecommunications operators are now deploying 40G or 100G coherent systems on long-haul dense wavelength-division multiplexing (DWDM) networks. These new technologies are certainly beneficial, but they also bring about new test and measurement challenges, in particular for optical spectrum analyzers (OSAs), versatile test instruments that are key to successful DWDM system commissioning and troubleshooting. Indeed, recent 40G/100G coherent systems featuring polarization multiplexing have made some traditional OSA measurements, such as optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR), impossible to carry out. This white paper first establishes why an OSA is a fundamental test instrument in DWDM networks. Next, it identifies common OSA measurements being performed in the field, and then explains why a Pol-Mux OSA is required to perform OSNR measurements of 40G/100G coherent networks. Lastly, it presents EXFO’s Pol-Mux OSA, the first third-party test instrument on the market that allows accurate OSNR measurement of Pol-Mux systems.

Pages

Feature

Cost and compatibility can make a compelling case for pushing 100Gb/s bandwidth over a single optical channel, both as individual links and supporting 400Gb/s Ethernet, finds Andy Extance

Analysis and opinion
Analysis and opinion
Feature

Robin Mersh takes a look at how the industry is creating next-generation optical access fit for 5G

Feature

Technological advances to aid the increasing demand for bandwidth, on the path towards the terabit network, should lead to optical signals that are flexible and adaptive, like water, argues Dr Maxim Kuschnerov and Dr Yin Wang