Viewpoint

22 August 2016

Encircled Flux (EF) is the final piece in the puzzle of reducing measurement uncertainty in multimode optical fiber cable loss measurements. It is potentially the biggest contribution to variations in loss measurements.

12 August 2016

In an ever-growing FTTH market worldwide, service providers are constantly looking for ways to lower the cost and simplify the process of rolling out fibre networks. One area of the network where speed and simplicity are of paramount importance is the final drop to the consumer. As the saying goes, you never get a second chance to make a first impression. To get the customer relationship off on the right foot, service providers need to ensure that the installation of a new fibre connection proceeds smoothly and with minimal disruption while working in the subscriber’s home. A new product to the market, which can help service providers ensure that installation is quick and efficient, are pre-connectorised fibre cable bundles with blowable ferrules.

25 May 2016

Data Center Interconnect is driving optical innovation. Component suppliers and systems vendors are racing to offer the highest data rate, longest reach and least expensive optics for use within and between data centers. The innovation in speed, packaging, digital signal processing and systems is enabling new applications for data center operators. This article describes some of the innovative ways data centers are using these new options in optical transport for data center interconnect.

10 March 2016

A new and welcome trend that has emerged sees utility companies using their existing infrastructure and pre-existing utility ducts in innovative ways to provide customer connections. This trend is obviously driven by the desire to eliminate the cost of installation, which can ultimately make or break any FTTH project…

1 March 2016

Modern high bit rate optical communication channels now use polarization, amplitude and phase of the optical carrier to encode digital information. The future of optical communication requires Optical Arbitrary Waveform Generation (O-AWG). The ability to produce any kind of optical waveform, through the use of an optical modulator and an electrical AWG requires better accuracy and reliability than ever before. O-AWG’s require full control of an optical modulator, including the ability to bias at any arbitrary point on the modulator's electrical-to-optical transfer functions. The needs of the research and development community are ever changing and a truly arbitrary O-AWG will be as necessary to the optical R&D engineer as is the electrical AWG is for the RF engineer.

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