NEWS

Atlantic Metro adds 200G capacity to DWDM network in partnership with PacketLight Networks

TEL AVIV, ISRAEL – PacketLight Networks has announced a partnership with Atlantic Metro to upgrade its existing dense division wavelength multiplexing (DWDM) network routes to 200G capacity. PacketLight extended capacity using its alien wavelength solution and adding a 200G single coherent wavelength. Atlantic Metro provides cloud hosting, nationwide network connectivity, and secure data centre colocation to over 1,100 customers ranging from Fortune 500 enterprises, to healthcare organisations, legal firms, web start-ups, media, and retail.

Atlantic metro integrated PacketLight’s PL-2000M flexible muxponder/transponder solution with a built-in optical amplifier and optical switch to provide increased capacity to their network at three different metro locations, with compatibility for 4 x 40GbE and 4 x 10GbE protocols.

‘With data consumption increasing exponentially year-over-year, the need for a higher capacity network that supports 200G is a requirement for modern IT infrastructure,’ says Koby Reshef, CEO of PacketLight Networks. ‘By leveraging our PL-2000M solution, Atlantic Metro was able to provide their customers with the capacity needed to mitigate network congestion, all in a 1U footprint to promote massive opex and capex savings.’

PacketLight’s vendor-agnostic solution allows a simple upgrade to Atlantic Metro’s existing optical infrastructure layer without the need for a ‘rip and replace’ of DWDM Muxes. The 200G uplink is tunable and covers the entire ITU 50GHz and 100GHz grids, providing Atlantic Metro with a simple way to make necessary adjustments and select the required wavelength. The PL-2000M is equipped with on-board Layer-1 (the physical layer) security, which adds the lowest amount of latency for secure data transfer across a network.

‘PacketLight’s solution was the perfect fit for our need to add capacity to our network in a simple and affordable way,’ says Stephen Klenert, chief strategy officer and co-founder of Atlantic Metro. ‘We were able to implement their equipment with no changes to our existing network architecture and most importantly no impact to existing customer circuits.’

www.PacketLight.com

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