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Bluebird Network adds 45 fibre route miles in St. Louis metropolitan region

U.S. mid-west carrier, Bluebird Network is expanding its fibre-optic network with the addition of 45 fibre route miles in the St. Louis metropolitan area and St. Charles County, specifically within Clayton, Wentzville, and Weldon Springs, Missouri. 

The company provides fibre to both rural and urban areas connecting major Midwest cities including Kansas City, Chicago, Tulsa, Springfield, and St. Louis.  The expansion will focus on connecting industrial areas within the St. Louis metropolitan area, in order to bring reliable, high bandwidth, carrier-class internet and data services, delivered over a fibre-optic network.  Bluebird Network customers include carrier and enterprise firms, connecting to wireless towers, government and public safety institutions, as well as healthcare centres and other facilities.

The network expansion will be connected to the Bluebird underground data centre, located in Springfield, Missouri, using the carrier’s existing fibre infrastructure. The build is scheduled to begin this month and is projected to be completed before the end of Q4 2018.

Michael Morey, president and CEO of Bluebird Network commented: ‘For several years, the City of St. Louis, the St. Louis Development Corporation, and the St. Louis Economic Development Partnership have been seeking to upgrade and expand the regional fibre-optic infrastructure, and this expansion will serve to meet that demand.’

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