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G&H enhances access to US aerospace and defence customers via Gould Fiber acquisition

Gooch & Housego (G&H) has acquired US fibre optic components and sub systems specialist Gould Fiber Optics (GFO) in a move designed to strengthen the company’s position, whilst providing enhanced access to strategic US aerospace and defence customers.

G&H says the acquisition enables it to take a step toward meeting its objective of wider diversification in its core markets. GFO has the technology and routes to market required to access the US aerospace and defence fibre optic market – an area that previously denied to the company, due to International Trade in Arms (ITAR) regulations. In turn G&H’s much larger US sales and business development resources and the combined broader based product portfolio should provide the platform for greater expansion within this sector.

Mark Webster, CEO, at G&H explained: ‘This acquisition enables us to take another step towards diversifying our business, allows G&H access to previously restricted markets, as well as reducing, still further, the company’s dependency on what remains a cyclical micro-electronics sector. GFO is a high-quality business, with a long-standing tier 1 Aerospace and Defence customer base, complementary technology and a strong financial track record. We are very much looking forward to working with Gould, management, staff and customers.’

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