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MegaFon opens Europe-Asia trunk line

Russian telecommunications operator MegaFon has announced the commercial launch of a 8,700km fibre-optic trunk line. The company says the 'Dream' line will be the optimal route for high-speed data transmission between Europe and Asia.

The line extends through Kazakhstan, Russia, Ukraine, Slovakia, Austria, Germany, and was created in cooperation with Kazakhtelecom and Interoute. The route runs from the German city of Frankfurt-am-Main to the Kazakhstan-China border.

Megafon says the new line will reduce delay time, compared to other trunk lines on the market. It says this will allow MegaFon’s business partners to gain a competitive advantage for their clients, including financial institutions, online traders and internet companies.

One important advantage claimed the project is higher reliability of the system compared to submarine cables, which can be characterized by long interruptions due to external factors. This was achieved through the geographical location of DREAM, which runs from the Kazakhstan-China border to Frankfurt-am-Main on a terrestrial route with low seismic activity.

MegaFon’s general director, Ivan Tavrin, said: 'The unique geographical position of Russia allows us to offer the market an attractive route for transmission of information. By cooperating with MegaFon, the international telecom operators will be able to utilise the safest and most optimal route to organise the transfer of data for their clients, as well as increase the reliability of their networks.

'Every year the volume of traffic sent from Europe to Asia, along with the demand for the capacity of communication channels, is steadily growing. Therefore, we view this project as both significant and promising for MegaFon’s business.'

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