NEWS

NetQuest, HUBER+SUHNER Polatis partner to deliver optical surveillance techniques for cybersecurity

NetQuest and HUBER+SUHNER Polatis, revealed at the OFC conference in San Diego, a joint effort to deliver the industry’s first automated mass optical network surveillance solution combining NetQuest’s intelligent network survey and traffic intercept functions with HUBER+SUHNER Polatis’s all-optical switching technology.
 
Designed to aid the task of finding advanced cyber threats, the development from NetQuest-HUBER+SUHNER Polatis provides instant access to thousands of individual fibers for monitoring, by introducing automation to the optical network data access challenge.
 
Jesse Price, CEO and president of NetQuest Corporation commented: 'NetQuest and HUBER+SUHNER Polatis are providing broad visibility to an unprecedented volume of traffic and giving today’s mission-critical traffic monitoring tools a significant advantage in detecting advanced cyber threats. Our collaboration on an advanced automation technique for accessing big data carried over large-scale optical transport networks will exponentially improve cyber intelligence missions and network monitoring functions.'
 
Added Gerald Wesel, president and general manager of HUBER+SUHNER Polatis: 'While networks have grown exponentially in both volume and transmission speed, cyber attacks have likewise intensified in number and frequency, increasing the threat to global communications infrastructure. Combining our best-in-class all-optical network switching technology, which is right-sized for this application, with NetQuests’s innovative approach to access and monitoring, provides unprecedented advantages to mission-critical fiber access and monitoring missions.'
 
 

 

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