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NTT ICT selects Mellanox Ethernet solutions to accelerate multi-cloud data centres

Mellanox Technologies Ethernet solutions have been selected by NTT Communications ICT Solutions (NTT ICT) to accelerate multi-cloud data centres. 

The IT provider of solutions to Australian enterprise and government clients selected 25G and 100G Ethernet networking technology from Mellanox – including spectrum-based switches running Cumulus Linux; ConnectX adapters; and LinkX cables and transceivers – to help enable high-performance, low-latency, easily consumable cloud-based services, and provide customers with multi-cloud service broker solutions.

Accelerating the core network in this way, alongside the adoption of agile, automated, open networking software from Cumulus Networks, is designed to allow NTT ICT to offer multi-cloud service broker services. Customers are now able to quickly connect services hosted in NTT ICT’s data centres to other cloud providers and easily consume IP Transit, Storage as a Service (SaaS), Platform as a Service (PaaS), and other managed cloud services.

Kevin Deierling, vice president of marketing, Mellanox Technologies commented: ‘As a global IT leader and critical business driver, NTT ICT is leveraging Mellanox end-to-end Ethernet solutions to broker, deliver and manage a best-in-class, broad range of services to 3rd party cloud providers,” said. “We are pleased to provide NTT ICT with the infrastructure needed to expand their business offering to include multi-cloud service brokering.’

Tarquin Bellinger, COO at NTT ICT: ‘We are excited to collaborate with Mellanox and Cumulus to integrate the next generation of software-defined networking into our data centres. The new core network will enable us to serve as a multi-cloud service broker with expanded capabilities and easy automation management, offering low latency, fast and scalable services to other cloud providers and our customers.’

 

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