NEWS

Telecom Austria hails successful field trial

Telekom Austria has successfully tested the 400G high-speed technology between Zagreb in Croatia and Ljubljana in Slovenia. This field trial focused on testing the 400 Gbit/s technology on existing fibre optic cables.

'The continuing increase in data volumes in the years to come will require the timely planning of new technologies over long-distance networks. The use of digital services will become increasingly important going forward. The smooth transmission of voice telephony, mobile and fixed net Internet as well as high-definition cable television is an important precondition to be able to meet the needs of an ever-growing customer base,' said Günther Ottendorfer, chief technology officer for Telekom Austria Group.

Telekom Austria Group says its backbone networks play a crucial role particularly for services such as business applications such as bank transactions, CRM and SAP systems. Jointly with its technology partner Alcatel-Lucent, Telekom Austria Group's experts and technicians were able to demonstrate via this field trial that, between Zagreb and Ljubljana, it is possible to achieve a four-fold increase in data rates from 100 Gbit/s to 400 Gbit/s using existing fibre optic cables.

Luis Martinez Amago, Alcatel-Lucent's president for Europe, Middle East and Africa, said: 'This is the latest in a growing number of trials that show how our 400G Photonic Service Engine can boost the performance of today's optical transport networks.

'Following the announcement last year of our work with Telekom Austria to deliver 100G technology, this trial further highlights both our leadership in Optical Networking as well as our understanding of Telekom Austria's need for innovation. Alcatel-Lucent's 400G solution will help the company ensure the reliable transport of high-demand residential and mission-critical business services.'

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