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Three-way networks collaboration

NTT has launched a collaborative study with Alcatel-Lucent Japan and Fujitsu to develop server architecture for future networks.

The companies say the project aims to realise a server architecture that maximises the common part of various functionalities of communication networks with reliability, scalability and easy maintenance. They say the architecture will allow service providers to develop their services efficiently by focusing only on their logic.

The primary roles of three participating companies are as follows:
    •    NTT will provide the telecom carrier requirements and the core technology for distributed computing with scale-out and redundant architecture;
    •    Alcatel-Lucent Japan will provide the system requirements based on the global market and to provide the technologies for server virtualisation and orchestration that meet the operation and maintenance requirements of telecom carriers; and
    •    Fujitsu will provide the systematisation of distributed computing and to provide maintenance and operation technology of scale-out communication control server.

A statement from the three companies said: 'The project aims to establish new server architecture that will enable the three partners to develop service applications at an early stage.

'In addition, this collaboration aims to expand and apply the resulting technology to support other fields that require reliability, scalability, and maintainability including financial or medical fields, as well as in the communication network field in the future. The desire of the involved companies is to see this technology spread and become a global standard.'

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