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TIM notifies Italian authority of intention to separate fixed access network

Italian operator TIM – formerly known as Telecom Italia – has officially notified Italy’s communications regulatory authority, Agcom, that it is to begin the process of voluntarily separating its fixed access network.

The notification marks the start of the formal procedure, in accordance with the Electronic Communications Code, whereby TIM will voluntarily separate its access network through the creation of a separate legal entity (to be known as NetCo), which will be 100 per cent controlled by TIM and the operator says it will hold its fixed infrastructure assets, including access network infrastructure, from the exchange to customers’ homes, as well as buildings, electronic equipment and IT systems.

NetCo will additionally have the investment capabilities to maintain the highest quality network and help Italy meet the European 2025 Digital Agenda ultrabroadband goals. The model is designed to guarantee full equality of treatment, due to a single access point, a ‘one-stop shop’ for regulated and unregulated wholesale services for all operators. TIM’s board of directors granted CEO Amos Genish the power to start the formal notification procedure on 6 May.

According to TIM, the creation of NetCo will leave the group scope unchanged and will occur in compliance with Italy’s ‘golden power’ provisions – which allow the government a veto right to prevent investments in the defence and national security sector and in networks, plants, assets and relationships deemed strategic for the national interest in the fields of energy, transportation and communications.

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