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Transmode provides 100Gbit/s service for Birdie event

Transmode, a supplier of packet-optical networking solutions, has announced that it has worked with IP-Only, the Nordic service provider, to supply 100Gbit/s high-speed services for the Birdie gaming event in Sweden.
 
Two 100Gbit/s services were provided as a short-term capacity boost to support the Birdie event and ran for the duration of the show, in the beginning of June, from Uppsala to Stockholm (approximately 50km) over an existing infrastructure. The deployment has ensured that the Swedish gaming community at the Birdie event has the best possible connectivity and gaming experience.
 
Birdie is Sweden's largest non-profit computer gaming festival, which started in 1993 and takes place in the city of Uppsala. The annual event brings together thousands of people and players interested in computers, programming, creating content and gaming, which is also said to reflect "the unofficial future of IT systems".
 
As a long-term customer of Transmode, IP-Only, which is also based in Uppsala, Sweden, provides high-speed connectivity to its customers across Sweden, as and when required. The bandwidth available to the Birdie event demonstrates both the flexibility and the nature of the dynamic provisioning that the TM-Series can enable.
 
Mikael Westerlund, CTO at IP-Only said: 'We are delighted to be able to turn on a robust high speed service for the gaming community at the Birdie event. Working with Transmode's TM-Series has allowed us to quickly provision dynamic high-speed services.'

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