PRODUCT

EXFO OTS for testing 400G and beyond shown at ECOC

EXFO has expanded ts 400G ecosystem test portfolio with a new 400G test module featuring its Open Transceiver System (OTS). Revealed at ECOC in Rome, the OTS is a modular design concept that enables compatibility between current or future high-speed transceivers and EXFO’s test platforms (lab and field). 

Inserts to test specific transceiver types, including those used in 400G systems (e.g., QSFP-DD, OSFP, COBO, and CFP8), eliminate the need to replace entire testing modules and can be interchanged directly in the lab, out in the field or on the production floor.

The system delivers the capability to swap out transceiver inserts, supporting today’s interfaces and also yet undetermined ones. It debuts on the new FTBx-88460 Power Blazer: a compact testing solution that supports the latest high-speed ecosystem technologies - such as 400G, FlexE and OTUCn/FlexO - and transceivers on a single module. 

'We are proud of our position at the core of the 400G ecosystem—demonstrated by our participation alongside key industry partners in important interoperability events at ECOC,' said Stéphane Chabot, EXFO’s vice president, test and measurement. 'These activities, strategic relationships and new innovations contribute to our goal of delivering smart solutions that help our customers get the most from their testing investments while staying ahead of the 400G curve.'

Visitors to ECOC were also able to witness a live 400G Ethernet connection on the Ethernet Alliance booth, featuring the emerging QSFP-DD 400G interface supported by EXFO’s 400G test solution and innovative Open Transceiver System (OTS).

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