NEWS
Tags: 

BT to invest further £50 million in UK broadband

BT is invest a further £50 million into its commercial fibre broadband programme over the next three years, it has announced. The investment will benefit more than 30 cities, helping to make high speed broadband available to more than 400,000 additional premises.

The telecom operator is spending more than £3 billion on deploying fibre broadband and its open-access fibre network already passes more than 18 million homes and businesses. The footprint is likely to grow rapidly as rural fibre programmes are delivered.

UK fibre broadband availability currently stands at 73 per cent, when all networks are taken into account. The current Broadband Delivery UK programme, which receives financial support from both central and local government, is set to extend that coverage to around 90 per cent by late 2015 or early 2016.

Mike Galvin, managing director for network investment at Openreach, said: 'Our fibre programme is going extremely well with our engineers connecting homes and businesses across the UK. Some city areas have proved challenging in the past but we are returning to those and will pass hundreds of thousands of additional premises with fibre.

'We are reaching vast swathes of rural Britain with our public sector partners but we will upgrade these city areas under our own steam. Businesses in cities already have access to ultra-fast speeds but fibre will give them greater choice.'

Twitter icon
Facebook icon
Google icon
StumbleUpon icon
Digg icon
LinkedIn icon
Reddit icon
e-mail icon
Feature

Cost and compatibility can make a compelling case for pushing 100Gb/s bandwidth over a single optical channel, both as individual links and supporting 400Gb/s Ethernet, finds Andy Extance

Analysis and opinion
Analysis and opinion
Feature

Robin Mersh takes a look at how the industry is creating next-generation optical access fit for 5G

Feature

Technological advances to aid the increasing demand for bandwidth, on the path towards the terabit network, should lead to optical signals that are flexible and adaptive, like water, argues Dr Maxim Kuschnerov and Dr Yin Wang