NEWS

Ericsson appoints Ulf Ewaldsson as head of strategy and technology

STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN -- Ulf Ewaldsson is appointed Senior Vice President, Chief Strategy and Technology Officer and Head of Group Function Strategy and Technology at Ericsson (NASDAQ: ERIC). Ewaldsson brings to this position more than 20 years of experience in product management, industry development and customer relationships.

Rima Qureshi was appointed Head of Region North America July 1, 2016, and has since held dual roles. In addition to her role as Head of Region North America, Rima Qureshi will continue to drive the strategic partnership with Cisco.

Both Ewaldsson and Qureshi will continue to be Executive Leadership Team members and report to Ericsson's CEO.

Jan Frykhammar, President and CEO, Ericsson, says: "This move is a natural step as Rima focuses fully on driving the business development and customer relationships in one of the most advanced technology markets in the world. In the rapid technology development and transformation of our industry it makes perfect sense to combine technology strategy and strategy development into one process."

Ulf Ewaldsson graduated with Master's degrees of Science in Engineering and Business Management from Linköping Institute of Technology in Sweden. He started within Ericsson in 1990 and had since held various management positions in the group including Head of Ericsson in different countries and key customer accounts. As part of his previous assignments he has been based in China, Japan, Hong Kong and Hungary.

www.ericsson.com

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