NEWS

Hawaiki submarine system on track for completion June 2018, final splice complete

EATONTOWN, NEW JERSEY – TE SubCom has announced that the final splice of the Hawaiki Submarine Cable has been made and the system is on schedule to be in service in June 2018. 

With the final splice and all cable station installations complete, the Hawaiki Cable System has end-to-end connectivity and is entering final system testing. The more than 15,000km cable connects Sydney, Australia, Mangawhai Heads, New Zealand, Tafuna, American Samoa, Kapolei, Hawaii, USA, and Pacific City, Oregon, USA, including stubbed branches to facilitate future connections to New Caledonia, Fiji, and Tonga.

‘Hawaiki will positively impact the countless communities and economies in the Pacific,[ said Remi Galasso, CEO of Hawaiki. ‘Because of its scope and impact for communities in the Pacific region, the Hawaiki Cable System is a critical and multi-faceted endeavour. We are pleased with the progress to date and are looking forward to the project’s completion in June and the much-needed capacity it will bring to the region.’

Hawaiki will link Australia and New Zealand to the mainland United States, as well as Hawaii and American Samoa, with additional potential future landings in New Caledonia, Fiji, and Tonga. The system comprises more than 15,000km of high-capacity cable, and the use of TE SubCom's optical add/drop multiplexing (OADM) nodes allows for additional landings in the Pacific region to be added as needed.

The submarine cable will provide 43Tb of new capacity in the Pacific region, significantly dropping the cost of connectivity in this area. As the first and only carrier-neutral cable system between Australia, New Zealand and the USA, Hawaiki is in a unique position to meet new market requirements and deliver tailored capacity solution at the most competitive price.

www.SubCom.com

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