NEWS
Tags: 

IBM to acquire Aspera

IBM has announced a definitive agreement to acquire Aspera.

Licensed to clients and partners either in the Cloud or on premise, Aspera's high-speed transfer technology aims to reduces transmission of large files or data sets. The company says it overcomes inherent bottlenecks in broadband wide area networks that slow the transfer of large files, such as high-definition video or scientific research files, over long distances.

Typical data transfers over TCP/IP are hampered by network delays or packet loss, even over the fastest broadband networks. Aspera’s fasp protocol delivers high speeds over any network link regardless of file size, transfer distance or network conditions.

By combining Aspera with cloud computing, customers have a practical way to transport big data files to and from the cloud. Aspera’s fasp technology will be integrated with IBM’s recently acquired SoftLayer cloud infrastructure later next year.

‘With this acquisition, IBM addresses a key challenge for globally integrated enterprises by allowing them to move large data files much faster to the individuals who need them, wherever in the world they may be.’ said John Mesberg, vice president for B2B and commerce solutions.

This acquisition builds on IBM’s 'Smarter Commerce' initiative by allowing businesses to accelerate their digital supply chains between partners and suppliers. This also extends IBM’s market-leading capabilities in managed file transfer with a complementary set of capabilities to help enterprises further gain control and oversight of their data transfers. 

 The acquisition of Aspera is subject to customary closing conditions and is expected to close in the first quarter 2014.

 

Twitter icon
Facebook icon
Google icon
StumbleUpon icon
Digg icon
LinkedIn icon
Reddit icon
e-mail icon
Feature

As data demand ramps ever higher, researchers are looking to innovative amplifier designs to help transport a broader light spectrum through optical fibres, finds Andy Extance

Feature

Duncan Ellis shares his views about the increased focus on automation from network operators, and how the physical layer has so far stubbornly resisted the move

Feature

Switching off copper networks where fibre has been deployed is the end game, so why are so few operators doing it, wonders Pauline Rigby

Feature

With demand for fibre to the premises increasing, Keely Portway looks at the role training plays in ensuring installation skills remain available to meet this growing demand

Analysis and opinion