NEWS

Independent Fibre Networks Ltd (IFNL) rebrands

Cardiff, UK – Independent Fibre Networks Ltd (IFNL) has rebranded to Open Fibre Networks Ltd (OFNL), in order to more closely reflect its position and offering in the market place.

The newly named OFNL has been connecting and operating next-generation fibre optic networks to new build residential and commercial developments across the UK since 2008. OFNL's Fibre-to-the-Home (FTTH) networks deliver a future-proofed telecoms infrastructure, ensuring customers enjoy a market leading voice, ultra-fast broadband, and television service. Fibre networks from OFNL are completely open access, with speeds of up to 1Gb/s. The company actively encourages service providers to join its network, so it can provide customers with a range of choice for their broadband services.

Andrew Robinson, commercial operations director at OFNL, said: ‘We entered the market in response to growing market concerns around the long delays customers were experiencing when subscribing to broadband services when moving into their new homes. We now provide a real alternative to traditional players in the market and offer a full Fibre-to-the-Home network solution that provides a cost-effective alternative for house builders, as well as a more efficient and hassle-free installation, and a better overall experience for residents. It seems fitting that our brand should reflect this and we are proud to now be known as Open Fibre Networks Ltd.’

www.ofnl.co.uk

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