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Molex snapped up by Koch

Koch Industries has completed a $7.2 billion acquisition of Molex, a global electronic components company.

The acquisition was finalised through the merger of Koch Industries’ wholly owned subsidiary, Koch Connectors, with and into Molex. As a result of the merger, Molex is now an indirect wholly-owned subsidiary of Koch Industries, retaining its name and headquarters in Lisle, Illinois. The company will continue to be operated by its current management team.

All of the outstanding shares of Molex, including the common stock, the class A common stock and the class B common stock were converted into a right to receive $38.50 per share in cash, plus an adjustment of $0.18 per share representing a pro rata portion of the regular quarterly cash dividend.

'We’re pleased to welcome Molex’s 36,000 talented leaders and employees to Koch,' said Charles Koch, chairman and chief executive officer of Koch Industries. 'Molex is a great company that creates real value for its customers and society, and matches up well with our culture and core capabilities.'

Dave Robertson, president and COO of Koch Industries said: 'This acquisition represents  a new platform for growth and innovation for us. We’re looking forward to applying our philosophy at Molex to help identify and capture additional opportunities.'

'Now that the transaction has closed, we are eager to move forward with our new owners,' said Martin Slark, chief executive officer of Molex. 'We believe that combining the global strengths of Molex and Koch will create an exciting future for all our stakeholders.'

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