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Prysmian furthers its Baltic connections

Prysmian Group has been awarded a new contract worth approximately €730 million to design, produce and install the power cable systems for the offshore wind park cluster, West of Adlergrund, in the German Baltic Sea.

The connection projects will involve the design, supply and installation of multiple high-voltage submarine cable systems between planned offshore wind parks, approximately 40 km north-east of the island of Ruegen, to the Lubmin substation in north east Germany (and consequently with the mainland electricity grid) along a route approximately 90 km long.

The 220 kV HVAC (high voltage alternate current) three-core extruded cables (including a fibre optic cable system) will be produced in the group's centres of technological and manufacturing excellence for submarine cables in Pikkala (Finland) and Arco Felice (Naples, Italy). Marine cable laying will be performed using the newly upgraded Cable Enterprise DP 2 ship, specifically geared to use her particular expertise in offshore wind farm connections in the best way to serve the growing markets in Northern Europe and to provide highly complex installation solutions. The production and installation of the West of Adlergrund cable systems will start in 2015.

'This new project is the fourteenth secured by the group and further highlights not only the group’s strategic role to support the realisation of important development plans in the field of renewable wind power, but also the entire power transmission industry’s trust in Prysmian's capability and expertise as a provider of submarine and land cable system,' said Marcello Del Brenna, CEO of Prysmian Powerlink.

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