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Series-B funding allows Dutch developer to increase production, develop future technologies

Dutch developer of dense wavelength-division multiplexing (DWDM) optical components, Effect Photonics has now completed its second round of financing to accelerate the ramp of its tunable small form-factor pluggable production line and aid development of future technologies.

The company addresses the need for low-cost, wavelength-tunable optical transceivers with industrial temperature specification to be deployed within the next generation 5G mobile infrastructure. This in turn, says Effect Photonics, will accelerate the adoption of the Internet of Things (IoT) interconnecting computing devices and machines without the need for human-to-human or human-to-computer interaction.

The funding round – the amount of which has not yet been disclosed – was led by independent venture capital fund, Innovation Industries. Partner, Nard Sintenie commented: ‘We are delighted to be a part of Effect Photonics who are at the forefront of developing optical transceivers with its photonic integrated circuits targeted at high growth markets such as 5G and fuelling the adoption of IoT enabled devices.’

James Regan, CEO at Effect Photonics said: ‘We are experiencing now in photonics what we saw in the electronics integration revolution last century. There, the birth of the Integrated Circuit enabled the mass deployment of powerful solutions. We integrate all of the optical functions into a single chip and combine it with low-cost, non-hermetic packaging and automatic tuning. Thus DWDM, the proven solution for core and metro networks, is now simple, cost-effective and scalable enough for 5G infrastructure rollouts around the world.’

Added CTO, Boudewijn Docter: ‘This funding also allows us to really push forward with our next-generation technology programme to bring even more powerful optical systems to the edges of the network.’

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