PRODUCT

ADVA brings secure zero touch provisioning to network edge device range

ADVA’s FSP 150 ProNID range of network edge devices now features zero touch provisioning.

By removing the need for manual intervention in the provisioning, testing and activation of demarcation equipment, the company says it is dramatically simplifying how communications service providers configure the network edge.

Zero touch provisioning is designed to avoid the expense and effort caused by human error whilst improving scalability. The technology also uses proven cryptographic methods to safely authenticate devices and ensure the integrity of software and configuration data.

Automated device configuration and service provisioning is already supported by the company’s high-performance NFVI software solution Ensemble Connector, and now it's being applied to a wider portfolio, enabling a consistent approach to automated service activation with edge compute nodes as well as simple service demarcation devices. All customers need to do is connect the edge device to the network. It then authenticates itself and establishes a secure connection to a server holding the latest firmware and configuration data. The firmware and software patches are then installed and, in the case of edge compute nodes, the new services are downloaded, instantiated and taken live. The new capabilities are closely aligned with IETF ZTP and Call Home specifications, building on widely accepted NETCONF protocol and YANG device modelling language.

Christoph Glingener, CTO, COO, ADVA commented: ‘This one disruptive innovation will instantly reduce complexity and cost like nothing we've seen before. That's why we've injected zero touch provisioning into our edge devices and why we're committed to automation across our full technology range. And, as automation mustn't come at the expense of security, we're also combining it with strong security controls.’

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