PRODUCT

Cube Optics to show extended LAN-WDM optics at ECOC 2016

HUBER+SUHNER Cube Optics will present its latest, ultra-compact, extended LAN-WDM optical sub-components at this year’s European Conference on Optical Communication (ECOC) in Düsseldorf, Germany, booth 259.

The new optical sub-components – which conform to the IEEE 802.3bs 400GBase-LR8/FR8 proposal and are compatible with the CFP8 form factor – comprise a compact, directly-reflecting, wavelength multiplexer. The product builds on the proven, reliable design applied in 100GBase-LR4/ER4 and 40GBase-LR4/ER4 transceivers. 

“The extended LAN-WDM is an important development for the progress of 400GBase-LR8/FR8 pluggables and acts as a pre-cursor technology to integrated active-passive sub-components which we already are working on,” said Dr. Thomas Paatzsch, general manager of HUBER+SUHNER Cube Optics AG.

With its miniature size of only 17.1 x 12.5 x 6.5mm, the extended LAN-WDM defines the standard for next-generation, client-side pluggable transceivers in data centres and access network applications. Cube Optics’ miniaturised packaging platform leverages advanced micro-injection moulding techniques and enables network operators to realize low-cost, high performance architectures.

“The increasing demand for higher bandwidth in metro access networks propels the industry to move toward higher transmission speeds,” said John D’Ambrosia, chairman of Ethernet Alliance. “Continuing innovation and development of the optical technologies, such as HUBER+SUHNER Cube Optics AG’s extended LAN-WDM, enables the industry to swiftly transition from 100G to the next generation of 400GbE client optics.”

The extended LAN-WDM components and modules are currently available for customer sampling. Volume production will start at the end of 2016.

Company: 
Feature

Cost and compatibility can make a compelling case for pushing 100Gb/s bandwidth over a single optical channel, both as individual links and supporting 400Gb/s Ethernet, finds Andy Extance

Analysis and opinion
Analysis and opinion
Feature

Robin Mersh takes a look at how the industry is creating next-generation optical access fit for 5G

Feature

Technological advances to aid the increasing demand for bandwidth, on the path towards the terabit network, should lead to optical signals that are flexible and adaptive, like water, argues Dr Maxim Kuschnerov and Dr Yin Wang