PRODUCT

Finisar demonstrates 100G QSFP28 SWDM4 module

Having demonstrated a 40G version back at OFC in March, Finisar used ECOC 2015 to show off the world’s first 100G QSFP28 SWDM4 module operating over multimode fibre.

The new module is designed to enable more cost-effective upgrades for data centre operators who have cabling infrastructure based on standard duplex multimode fibre. Typically an upgrade from 10 to 40 and 100 Gigabit Ethernet would require duplex fibre to be replaced by parallel fibre ribbon cables. The new module allows data centre operators to reuse their existing cables, thus providing a much more cost-effective upgrade path.

The module employs short-wave wavelength division multiplexing (SWDM), and Finisar's well-established and reliable shortwave vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) technology. SWDM combines multiples wavelengths onto duplex multimode fibre. The new wavelengths are provided by VCSELs operating in the 850 – 900nm range.

VCSELs offer the lowest cost, highest density, and lowest power dissipation in the optical industry, says Finisar, making this a very attractive option for cloud and enterprise data centre operators. By using 10 VCSELs, each operating at a slightly different wavelength, a single SWDM transceiver can reliably transfer 100 Gigabit Ethernet (4 x 25G).

Finisar's demonstration showed a 100G SWDM link established between a pair of QSFP28 modules operating over standard duplex multimode fibres.

“As the first to demonstrate and market SWDM modules, Finisar is committed to driving widespread adoption of this technology,” said Steffen Koehler, director of marketing at Finisar. “With the 100G SWDM4 module, Finisar helps to ensure that duplex multimode fibre continues to be the most cost-effective interconnect for all but the very largest data centres.”

Select customers are currently evaluating samples of the 100G QSFP28 SWDM4 module, Finisar says.

With this new module release, Finisar now has a complete suite of 40G and 100G pluggable transceiver products that are capable of operating on links built with the traditional, duplex multimode that is already installed in today's data centres.

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