PRODUCT

Fujikura introduces fibre recoater series

CHESINGTON SOUTH, UK: Fujikura is introducing a new series of Fujikura fibre recoaters – the FSR-05, FSR-06 and FSR-07. The recoaters feature easy-to-exchange moulds for common coating sizes including 196 µm, 255 µm, 280 µm, 450 µm, 670 µm and 1,000 µm. All recoaters consist of a programmable resin injection quantity and colored and non-colored fibre recoating capability. The FSR-06 and FSR-07 recoaters include proof testers to test the strength of fibre after recoating. 

“As the leader in fusion splicing technology, Fujikura continues to manufacture innovative products that improve highly technical processes for specialty markets,” commented Neil Bessant, Fusion Splicer Divisional Manager at Fujikura Europe. “Each fibre recoater is engineered to specific processes, providing flexibility to determine features needed.”

The FSR-05 recoater is the only model without a proof tester and is ideal for manufacturers that don’t require constant proof testing after each recoat. The FSR-06 model includes a proof tester with a linear clamping system for devices in which confirmation of reliability is required. The FSR-07 includes a mandrel proof tester and is ideal for reliability proof testing as well as tension testing to failure. 

All fibre recoaters feature automatic and easy operation as well as easy mould and recoat material exchange. Additionally, the recoaters include a PC interface via USB. Compatible with special recoating compound, the recoaters provide a higher stiffness recoating of 900 µm jacketed fibres. 

The new recoaters provide advanced recoating solutions for applications in fibre laser, fibre sensing, submarine and optical components. The FSR Series is the latest addition to enhance Fujikura’s ARCMaster product line which includes the LZM-100 laser splicing system, specialty fusion splicers, specialty cleavers, strippers and accessories. 

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