PRODUCT

Furukawa launches FitelNinja NJ001 fusion splicer

The ongoing expansion of FTTx networks worldwide calls for affordable, compact and light fusion splicers that are also robust and can safely be used in demanding environments including high, narrow or dark places both inside the home and on construction sites.  Furukawa Electric has designed the FitelNinja NJ001 fusion splicer to meet these requirements.

As robust as its predecessor the S123C, the FitelNinja is considerably smaller and lighter, with improved ease of use, portability and durability, the company claims.

The splicer is compact and light weight, about 40 per cent smaller than the S123C.

The splicing chamber has been redesigned for ease of use; four times more space has been created around the fibre holders, providing enough room for fingers to facilitate fibre loading.

The three LED lamps illuminate the splicing chamber make it easier to work in a dark environment.

The four rubber pads on the corners of the machine increase the shock resistance of the machine. In tests performed at Furukawa Electric laboratories, standard operations could be carried out after being dropped from 76cm on five different angles - front, rear, bottom, left and right hand side (Note: Furukawa does not guarantee that the machine will always be undamaged under these conditions).

The device incorporates fast splicing operation – taking approximately 13 seconds per splice in semi-automatic mode - for single fibres.

It is also compatible with splice-on-connectors (SOC). The detachable heater clamp makes it easier to apply heat to SOCs in the heat sleeve shrinking process.

With its low power consumption, the NJ001 is capable of performing 100 splicing and heating cycles on a single battery charge.

Other features are designed for easy maintenance. The FitelNinja features a detachable V-groove, and has tool-less electrode replacement and mirror free alignment system. These features make it easier to maintain the fusion splicer in an optimal condition. The device is also dust and water resistant under IP52 equivalent conditions.

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