PRODUCT

Micro SFP+ connector from TE saves board space

TE Connectivity has introduced its new micro SFP+ connector and cable assembly, which slashes space requirements on faceplates and printed circuit boards (PCBs) in telecom, datacom, networking and medical diagnostic equipment.

The new micro SFP+ connector and cable assembly are up to 50 per cent smaller in width and length than current SFP+ interconnects, enabling denser equipment designs than before.

The new micro SFP+ connector and cable assembly supports up to 10 Gb/s data transmission as well as 10 Gigabit Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet, Fibre Channel, InfiniBand and Fibre Channel over Ethernet (FCoE) protocols.

The new product increases faceplate density and saves PCB space: the micro SFP+ needs as little as 15mm of board space. One micro SFP+ frees up 19 per cent more faceplate space than one SFP+ connector.

The connector also improves signal integrity, says TE. The cable assembly and connector were designed with a staggered contact configuration that improves signal routing. Additionally, the bottom and top contacts have been further optimised for speed. Electromagnetic interference (EMI) is minimized through a diecast housing, cable shield crimped at 360 degrees, and an extended EMI shield over the cable’s plug.

For manufacturing automation, the board interconnect combines the connector and cage into one finished product to allow automated board placement. High temperature pin-in-paste soldering can be achieved as the product withstands up to 265 degrees Celsius.

“Our new micro SFP+ connector and cable assembly is ideal for communications equipment designs where space is at a premium,” said Roel van Lokven, product manager for cable and cable assemblies in TE Data Communications. “This is the latest in a series of TE connector innovations that uniquely enables denser designs, higher performance and more cost-effective manufacturing.”

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