PRODUCT

NeoPhotonics demos 600G CFP2-ACO coherent module

Components and subsystems developer NeoPhotonics will demonstrate its pluggable coherent CFP2-ACO module designed for single-wavelength transmission at 400G and beyond at OFC 2017 in Los Angeles, on 21–23 March.

The new CFP2-ACO platform uses next-generation optical components that are based on proven technology for 100G and 200G applications. This includes NeoPhotonics’ high-bandwidth Class 40 coherent receiver, which is capable of 64Gbaud operation with 64-QAM modulation. This combination of baud rate and modulation scheme yields 600G transmission over metro and regional distances, with data centre interconnect (DCI) being the likely first application.

The platform also uses NeoPhotonics’ high-power, external-cavity, ultra-narrow linewidth tunable laser with low power consumption. The ultra-narrow linewidth makes it easier for the digital signal processor to unravel data that has been encoded by higher-order modulation schemes.

The coherent module offers single-wavelength transmission from 200G through 400G and up to 600G data rates. An analogue coherent optics design, the module does not contain the digital signal processor (DSP) chip. Moving the DSP outside the module makes it easier to manage the heat generated by the DSP when operating at these high data rates.

“Our new ClearLight 64Gbaud CFP2-ACO 400G/600G pluggable coherent transponder demonstrates a powerful new platform for NeoPhotonics which is capable of efficiently implementing 400G to 600G transmission networks,” said Tim Jenks, chairman and CEO of NeoPhotonics. "This exciting new platform is made possible by our advanced hybrid photonic integration technology utilising our latest advances in high-bandwidth receivers and ultra-narrow linewidth lasers in conjunction with higher order modulation.”

The Clearlight CFP2-ACO 400G/600G can be found on NeoPhotonics’ booth #3017.

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