PRODUCT

Setics upgrades FTTx design software

Setics has released Version 2 of Setics Sttar, its pre-planning, design and optimisation software for FTTx deployments.

Designed by telecom experts, the latest version of the software incorporates feedback from clients on numerous projects, to make it even better at handling projects from the early pre-planning phases to more detailed engineering studies, the company claims.

In the context of the increasing number of ultra-fast broadband projects, particularly with the move to less dense and more complex areas (out of big cities), operators, building and engineering firms need to invest more in studies while keeping them accurate and fast, says Setics.

This is where Setics Sttar comes into play: with its design-automation capabilities, it becomes possible to design the FTTx network in a fraction of the time required by purely manual processes, while ensuring the design complies with engineering rules, and is accurate and consistent in terms of costing and engineering details.

With a new user interface and new features, Setics Sttar V2 offers a new integrated spatial information front-end that allows users to visualize and then modify the FTTx network being created, making it possible to mix the design-automation functions with manual modifications.

Version 2 includes a new graphical user interface (GUI) allowing users to visualize and modify the project being worked on. This new GUI offers a geographical information view, making the control and modification of the project faster and smoother. Using a GIS software like QGIS, Mapinfo or ArcGIS is still a valid option to benefit from their powerful data manipulation functionalities while using Setics Sttar; however, for direct visual interaction and area-based selective design-automation, the integrated visual map speeds up the iterative process of tuning a network design.

Also included in this version are new options to define any type of network hierarchy easily, and a simpler way to define and apply complex engineering rules, depending on many parameters like the type of infrastructure, number of fibres, or type of cable.

Currently in beta testing, Setics Sttar V2 will be generally available in March 2015.

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