PRODUCT

Open Network Software

Wind River, a provider of embedded and mobile software, has released its Open Network Software for the development of next-generation data centre switches. Open Network Software is a complete, open software environment for the creation of network switches for software defined networks and infrastructures. Early customers of Open Network Software include Fujitsu.

With the exponential growth of data and traffic, network resources and connectivity needs are being pushed to new limits. The promise of software defined networking (SDN) offers a vision for more centralised and agile network control via virtualisation of data centre resources. Wind River says Open Network Software enables the separation of the data plane and control plane so that companies can begin to manage network services through abstraction as virtual services, and embrace technologies such as SDN and cloud computing.

A network switch software environment for true SDN switching, Open Network Software provides the tools and resources to create, modify, and update network layers' L1, L2+, and L3+ functionality. Open Network Software is designed with a flexible and modular open architecture with standard interfaces for management and control.

'As a technology that goes hand-in-hand with cloud computing, SDN can centralise and simplify control of a network, allowing companies to increase flexibility, efficiencies, and cost and energy benefits,' said Ricky Watts, general manager of switching solutions at Wind River. 'By using our comprehensive, extensible, ready-to-use software, customers can easily integrate SDN switching functionality into their products and get to market faster while saving on effort and expenses.'

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