PRODUCT

Solid Optics releases multi-function fibre tool

Optical transceiver vendor Solid Optics has released its new 'Multi Fiber Tool', which uniquely has four functions – recode, retune, power read and micro-OTDR (optical time-domain reflectometer).

Designed to save time and money for network professionals, this innovative tool enables users to quickly analyse and fix issues in optical communications and modify optics to keep up with rapidly changing network requirements.

The Solid Optics Multi Fiber Tool is a small plug-and-play handheld device with XFP/SFP+ slots on one end and a USB port on the other end. The tool can be connected to Android devices, iOS and Windows PCs using normal USB power and does not require batteries.

The Multi Fiber Tool was designed to analyse, determine, and solve immediate issues for network design professionals. For this purpose, Solid Optics equipped the tool with four distinct functionalities: recoding (to change brand compatibility, i.e. Cisco to Juniper), retuning (for Solid Optics’ tunable XFP and SFP 10G DWDM optics), power read (retrieve the optical power in dBm) and micro-OTDR (detect fibre length and segments )

“We are thrilled to introduce the Multi Fiber Tool to our technology community,” said Solid Optics managing director, Wouter Van Diepen. “This revolutionary tool will have a strong and immediate impact on the flexibility and analysing capabilities of our customers, freeing up critical IT budget dollars for other uses, and making them faster, more accurate and more efficient.”

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