PRODUCT

Sterlite Tech launches end-to-end FTTx-as-a-service to aid swift roll-out

Now available from Sterlite Tech is the FTTx MANTRA (Massive Agile Network Transformation), an end-to-end FTTx-as-a-service solution. This is designed to allow swift roll-out of fibre-to-the-point (FTTx) networks at the scale, latency and agility needed to meet future requirements of 5G, Internet of Things (IoT) applications, for global communication service providers, data centres and citizen networks.

FTTx MANTRA brings together optical-fibre products with integrated network design, virtualisation, an inclusive approach to hyper-scale network deployment and intelligent software solutions that use analytics and big data. The company says it has developed this technology to ensure faster and easier fibre infrastructure roll-out to the customers’ end-point. It could assist early adopters in reducing time-to-market of consumer broadband services as well as capital and operational costs of network deployment.

Indian network operator, Jio has taken on the new service to help widen the reach of its digital solutions to the last mile. Anuj Jain, business head, FTTH and enterprise for Jio commented: ‘Such disruptive and integrated last-mile connectivity service offering enables us to connect everyone, everything, everywhere at the highest quality and the most affordable price. This is transforming the quality of life, improving productivity of the people of India. This solution will help enable faster penetration of broadband in remote locations, bridging the digital divide between rural and urban India.’

Feature

Cost and compatibility can make a compelling case for pushing 100Gb/s bandwidth over a single optical channel, both as individual links and supporting 400Gb/s Ethernet, finds Andy Extance

Analysis and opinion
Analysis and opinion
Feature

Robin Mersh takes a look at how the industry is creating next-generation optical access fit for 5G

Feature

Technological advances to aid the increasing demand for bandwidth, on the path towards the terabit network, should lead to optical signals that are flexible and adaptive, like water, argues Dr Maxim Kuschnerov and Dr Yin Wang