Yenista Optics

PRODUCT

Yenista unveils high-performance component test platform

Test and measurement specialist Yenista Optics has developed the CTP10, a platform for testing passive optical components such as photonic integrated circuits and wavelength-selective switches.

The CTP10 platform has been designed for heavy duty measurements in both R&D and production environments. The mainframe hosts up to 10 hot-swappable modules and can handle up to four devices under test simultaneously.

PRODUCT

Yenista releases lasers for testing at CWDM wavelengths

France-based Yenista Optics has released a series of laser modules for testing optical components at coarse wavelength division multiplexing (CWDM) wavelengths from 1270nm to 1610nm, plus additional modules at 1625nm and 1650nm.

The CWDM modules correspond to the wavelengths used in 40Gb/s and 100Gb/s CLR4 and CWDM4 transceiver modules as well as conventional CWDM systems. The additional modules operate at supervisory channel and optical time-domain reflectometer (OTDR) wavelengths.

PRODUCT

OSA20

Yenista Optics, a manufacturer of fibre optic test and measurement equipment has developed a high-performance optical spectrum analyser. The OSA20, a diffraction-grating based instrument, operates from 1250 to 1700 nm and is the first instrument of its type to use a touch sensitive display with multi-touch gesture control.

Feature

Oleg Khaykin, CEO of Viavi Solutions, speaks candidly to Fibre Systems about how to compete in the challenging world of communications test and measurement

Feature

Hao Dong describes how innovative optical fibres and cabling could provide substantial benefits for connecting data centres across a wide range of distances

Feature

ECOC is the place to be to discover the latest technological and commercial innovations in optical components and networks. Here we highlight some of the exhibitors and events taking place in the exhibition hall.

Feature

Optical networks are playing an increasingly important role in the distribution of precise timing signals and synchronisation with sub-microsecond accuracy. Michael Ritter explains