NEWS

EXFO now exclusive worldwide reseller of pocketBERT's 10G and 100G bit-error-rate test solutions

QUEBEC CITY -- EXFO Inc. (NASDAQ: EXFO) (TSX: EXF) announced today that it has signed an exclusive, worldwide reselling agreement with pocketBERT. This agreement allows EXFO to add bit-error-rate testers (BERT) to its wide range of lab and manufacturing testing solutions for customers across the globe.

The reseller agreement targets two of pocketBERT's highly compact and easy-to-use testers, namely the pB10A, a 10 Gbit/s BERT, and the new pB100A4, a quad 24 Gbit/s to 30 Gbit/s BERT. These testers are both feature-rich and budget-friendly, and complement EXFO's existing solutions for network solution vendors (NSVs). EXFO supplies NSVs with an extensive array of lab and manufacturing test solutions from variable attenuators and power meters to switches, light sources and more.

"Thanks to this partnership with pocketBERT, our offer fills the market's current gap in bit error rate testing for network solution vendors worldwide. We are glad to deliver complete, cost-effective 10G and 100G testing solutions for NSVs and transceiver manufacturers in the fast-growing market segment of CFP2, CFP4, QSFP24 and QSFP28 tests," said Stéphane Chabot, Vice-President for EXFO's Physical Layer Test Division.

"pocketBERT is pleased to enter this resellers agreement with EXFO for our 10 Gbit/s and quad 28 Gbit/s BERT products. We are excited to reach a worldwide customer-base through EXFO's local presence and support structure. Clients now have easy access to a comprehensive range of products covering the optical and electrical 10G and 100G test and verification applications," indicated Oswin M. Schreiber, Co-Founder of pocketBERT Inc., based in San Diego.

For a live demo of the pB100A4, join EXFO at OFC, from March 22-24, 2016, in Anaheim, CA, at booth 2119.

For more information on the product, visit EXFO.com/pB100A4.

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