NEWS

Hybrid DOCSIS/GPON test successfully completed

A central European cable and satellite operator has successfully completed the testing of a hybrid last-mile broadband solution combining Iskratel’s GPON technology and Teleste’s DOCSIS-based mini-CMTS.

The proof of concept solution, which was originally developed by the two companies early last year, is designed to provide a fast and economical way to deliver gigabit broadband and new revenue-generating services to customers. The companies say that the operator can now reuse existing in-house coaxial cabling and enhance multi-gigabit networks to deliver the same gigabit speeds of fibre (see Teleste and Iskratel develop hybrid GPON/DOCSIS platform).

Simon Čimžar, chief solutions architect at Iskratel explained: ‘When it comes to upgrading networks, there is no “one size fits all” approach and in Europe there are many places where FTTH is just not possible. In these cases, our GPON/DOCSIS hybrid solution delivers fibre-level speeds and offers a clear roadmap towards symmetrical 10Gb/s services.’

Added Olli Leppänen, vice president of distributed access for Teleste: ‘We see distributed access architectures as a viable option for operators who wish to invest in next-generation broadband services. Hybrid fibre-coax infrastructure allows operators to expand their gigabit broadband services to their customers with lower costs and shorter time of deployment compared to full fibre infrastructures.’

 

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