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Vello teams up with six partners

Vello Systems, a provider of software solutions for customer-defined data centre and cloud services networks, has added six partners in key global markets to meet service provider and enterprise demand for the company’s customer-defined networking software solutions.

The new additions to the Vello Partner Network are PRO-ZETA, HCL, Espo Systems, Accunet, DifferenceIT, and SDN Solusi.  These IT solutions providers will use Pacnet’s ‘Pacnet-enabled network’  to drive Vello’s software into new global markets with new applications.

Vello’s customer-defined networks adapt networking infrastructure to meet customer defined application requirements and guaranteed service levels. By managing the total application environment, Vello’s customer-defined networks dynamically route communication flows based on business metrics, such as latency, bandwidth and security requirements, instead of technical routing metrics used by legacy networking solutions.

'We are excited to add these exceptional firms to our growing partner network,' said Karl May, co-founder and CEO of Vello Systems.

'Adding to our partner base is key for us to reach our growth and expansion objectives. Each of these partners brings new capabilities to our ecosystem, enabling Vello to empower customers with the ability to allocate network resources where they are most needed, creating connectivity efficiencies with improved costs and customer control.'

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