PRODUCT

ADVA enhances FSP 3000 CloudConnect DCI platform

In response to feedback from its customers, optical transport vendor ADVA Optical Networking has added new client rates, multiplexing and amplification capabilities to its FSP 3000 CloudConnect platform.

The company's flagship data centre interconnect (DCI) technology can now support 10Gb/s and 40Gb/s client rates in addition to 100Gb/s. This mix of client rates ensures that customers can effectively scale their DCI networks as their business demands. Also available are a range of new channel multiplexers, including a high-density 48-channel multiplexer on a single line card.

What's more, the ADVA FSP 3000 CloudConnect also features the industry's first self-contained DCI amplification line card that comprises all necessary components, including an optical supervisory channel.

The new features on ADVA’s CloudConnect platform will be useful for internet content providers and cloud service providers seeking to connect data centres across both shorter and longer distances. The new amplification capabilities will help transport DCI data over distances in excess of 1,200km at 200Gb/s per wavelength.

"In less than a few months, our DCI technology has secured a leading position within the data centre market," said Christoph Glingener, CTO, ADVA Optical Networking. "Our focus on scale, openness and efficiency has resonated across the globe. Yet this is hardly surprising when you consider that we built this technology directly with key players in the industry. This engagement didn't end with the launch though.”

Introduced in June, the ADVA FSP 3000 CloudConnect is one of the few DCI technologies on the market that features a 400Gb/s single line card and can deliver 51.2Tb/s of total throughput at 1.4Tb/s per rack unit (see ADVA unveils ‘all new’ CloudConnect platform for DCI). The platform is also a true open optical line system with support for the latest OpenConfig protocols, and offers very low power consumption of less than half a watt per Gb/s.

 

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