PRODUCT

Anritsu BERTWave MP2110A speeds up 100G optical module production lines

Anritsu BERTWave MP2110A series

Anritsu has launched the BERTWave MP2110A series, which is optimised for inspecting 100Gb/s multi-channel optical modules. The BERTWave MP2110A is an all-in-one bit error rate tester and sampling oscilloscope used to evaluate optical modules, including 100 Gigabit Ethernet, InfiniBand EDR and 32G Fibre Channel.

Not only does the all-in-one MP2110A design cut instrument capital investment, the instrument contains several features to shorten measurement times and increase yields on production lines and in development environments. High-speed sampling shortens measurement times, and the high-sensitivity error detector performance improves yields to help slash production costs of optical modules and devices, according to Anritsu.

Unlike previous measurement environments that required two separate instruments for measuring the BER and analysing eye patterns, the MP2110A supports simultaneous measurements. To shorten takt times – the average time to process each device – on production lines, the MP2110A maximum sampling speed has been increased to 250ksamples/s, slashing eye pattern analysis times for eye mask tests by 75 per cent compared to earlier instruments.

The MP2110A also supports options for expanding the built-in bit error rate tester (BERT) to four channels at up to 28.2Gb/s, and the built-in sampling oscilloscope to two channels. Thus, the MP2110A can perform simultaneous transceiver BER measurements of multi-channel optical modules, such as QSFP28, and simultaneous two-channel eye pattern analyses, reducing measurement times by up to 65 per cent compared to previous measurement systems.

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