PRODUCT

Coherent Solutions, National Instruments release new range of of PXI optical test modules

The new PXI optical test modules from Coherent Solutions and National Instruments (NI) include optical switches, optical-electrical converters, and variable optical attenuators, with more modules promised for release throughout the year.

Engineers can combine the new PXI optical test capability with a range of NI PXI instruments to drive mixed signal test in various optical test applications from design through production test. The new modules integrate seamlessly with NI’s electrical signal generation and analysis modules, and can be automated using similar programming APIs. As a result, engineers can simplify the design of optical test systems from wafer level up to pluggable modules and systems.

‘As optical communication technologies continue to provide the backbone for the Internet, data centres, and even 5G and Industrial Internet of Things applications, the optical community requires new test approaches that can lower the cost of test,’ explained Steve Warntjes, vice president of PXI platform and modular instruments R&D at NI.

‘We’re very excited by this partnership and the new test capabilities that our mixed-signal test systems will enable,’ added says Coherent Solutions CEO, Andy Stevens. ‘Our market domain and technical expertise, coupled with NI’s leadership in PXI along with their global sales, support, and service infrastructure, will be a great benefit to customers frustrated with the cost and complexity of interfacing electrical and optical test instruments from different vendors.’

www.coherent-solutions.com

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