PRODUCT

Finisar expands portfolio with next generation 100G serial QSFP28 and ‘industry first’ 50G SFP56 transceivers

Finisar has introduced a 100G serial FR transceiver in the popular QSFP28 form factor for inter-data centre, transport and router applications with 2km reaches.

Previewing at the recent OFC conference and exhibition in San Diego, the module leverages a standard 4x25G electrical interface, so that it plugs into standard QSFP28 slots, but employs just one serial 100G PAM4 optical channel. Once deployed in sufficient volume, it is expected to replace existing 100G QSFP28 CWDM4 modules. The company also plans to introduce a 500m DR version of this module.

Four of these FR or DR modules will be able to be used in a fan-out configuration with an IEEE standard 400G DR4 module, thus providing both 100G point-to-point and 100G-to-400G fan-out connectivity at 100G per lane.

Enabling the next generation of 50G single-lane optical connections, the company introduced – and demonstrated – at the same time, what it says is the industry's first 50G SFP56 SR and LR transceivers, using serial PAM4 technology. These modules represent the next key step in the highly popular SFP+ family of optical modules that have become ubiquitous in worldwide enterprise, data centre and service provider networks.  Primary applications for these products include server-to-switch and switch-to-switch 50G Ethernet connections, and future 5G wireless applications.

Leveraging in-house vertically integrated optics and IC's, these modules support interoperability with previous generations of 25G SFP28 and 10G SFP+ optical transceivers. Both modules comply with the corresponding 50GBASE-R specifications as defined in the IEEE standards and offer 50G PAM4 electrical and optical interfaces.

Rafik Ward, senior vice president, global marketing at Finisar commented: ‘Building upon 30 years of success, we are gearing up for a new era of optical interfaces that will be built on 50G and 100G PAM4 technology. This will enable us to deliver unprecedented bandwidth to customers in form factors that are backwards compatible with industry established footprints.’

Company: 
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