PRODUCT

Huber+Suhner launches Polatis high-density latching protection switches at ECOC

Huber+Suhner launched a new range of Polatis high-density latching protection switches for wireless and metro networks at ECOC 2018. The Series 6500 range adds an autonomous optical layer of 1+1, 1:1 and 2x2 bypass protection to multiple duplex services in a compact form factor.

The company additionally showcased the latest extensions to its Series 6000 Ultra range of transparent optical switches for system test and high-performance applications, now with the capability to extend up to 96x96 ports with typical optical loss of just 0.6dB. Enabling greater flexibility in test lab and monitoring networks, the new 384xCC optical circuit switch doubles the matrix size available in single-sided, any-fibre-to-any-fibre all-optical cross-connect.

Huber+Suhner Cube Optics, meanwhile, took to the booth to demonstrate the CUBO Converter. Ports are compatible with several multimode and single mode transceivers, simplifying deployments at remote cell sites. The capacity of the radio access network (RAN) can also be increased via the CWDM and DWDM multiplexing. Mobile operators also have the option of using compatible 1+1 optical line protection and optical add-drop multiplexers (OADMs) for an alternative path in the case of failure. The recently launched CUBO ultra-compact integrated multi-lambda 200 Gbps PAM4 Receiver Optical Sub-Assembly (ROSA), compatible with the 200G and 400GBase-FR8 standard, was also on show.

Alongside the Cube Optics and Polatis showcases, Huber+Suhner revealed the LC Coverino. Providing optimal handling for consumers to install at home, this connector is compatible with the company’s patented push-pull functionality, which can be added to the connector to offer ease of installation even in high-density environments. The new connector features an automatic, spring-loaded shutter mechanism allowing for the highest safety protection when in use.

Feature

Cost and compatibility can make a compelling case for pushing 100Gb/s bandwidth over a single optical channel, both as individual links and supporting 400Gb/s Ethernet, finds Andy Extance

Analysis and opinion
Analysis and opinion
Feature

Robin Mersh takes a look at how the industry is creating next-generation optical access fit for 5G

Feature

Technological advances to aid the increasing demand for bandwidth, on the path towards the terabit network, should lead to optical signals that are flexible and adaptive, like water, argues Dr Maxim Kuschnerov and Dr Yin Wang