PRODUCT

JGR Optics unveils EOTS Environmental Optical Test System

Test and measurement specialist JGR Optics has announced the availability of its new EOTS Environmental Optical Test System, which is used for insertion loss and return loss testing of optical components being stressed in a temperature/humidity chamber. The EOTS is designed to allow users to easily and accurately verify a component’s compliance to Telcordia and Verizon’s Fiber Optic Component (FOC) certification requirements components.

Based on the same technology as JGR Optics’ MS12 Return Loss Meter, the EOTS Environmental Optical Test System provides capacity of up to 210 channels and support for singlemode or multimode devices. The EOTS Environmental Optical Test System is the ideal tool to test a broad range of components used in transmission networks, the company claims.

“With the tremendous increase of fibre usage in data centres and in wireless fronthaul networks and the continuous deployments of FTTH components worldwide, effective and reliable qualification of cable assemblies and passive components is more important than ever,” said Mark Berezny, senior product line manager at JGR Optics. “JGR’s new EOTS Environmental Test System simplifies this process by providing a complete hardware, software and training package to ensure reliable results through an intelligent and intuitive system.”

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