PRODUCT

Light Brigade offers online fibre-optic training courses

Light Brigade is introducing its new Light Bites online training series, a series of training modules that cover a variety of fibre-optic subjects, both introductory and advanced.

Like other Light Brigade courses, the Light Bites modules feature high-quality images, animations, charts, and reference material that enhance the learning experience and help to reinforce important concepts. The modules are user friendly, can be completed in 60 to 90 minutes, and feature easy-to-use stop, pause, and rewind controls.

The first module of the Light Bites Training Series to be released is ‘Single-mode Technology: Theory and Fibers’. This module goes beyond the fundamentals to provide a deeper understanding of how optical theory applies to singlemode fibres and their applications. Topics include attenuation, dispersion, wavelength, windows and bands, and industry standards. The module also examines related applications and technologies, and details how different types of singlemode fibres are designed to address specific requirements. It concludes with a review quiz to ensure mastery of the content. Those who successfully pass the quiz will receive a Light Brigade certificate of completion.

Lee Kellett, general manager of Light Brigade, said: "This first module is just the beginning of our online learning plans. We understand that education needs to come in many different forms today. Light Bites will be an easy way for anyone to get quality fibre-optic education where and when they need it."

‘Single-mode Technology: Theory and Fibers’ may be purchased on the Light Brigade website at a time-limited introductory price.

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