PRODUCT

OptiDriver 100Gbps muxponder

MRV Communications, which provides packet and optical solutions, has added a 100Gbps multi-protocol, multi-rate muxponder to its recently introduced OptiDriver optical transport platform. It will help offer data centre operators, content delivery networks and cloud service providers a flexible path to a 100G optical transport network. The OptiDriver 100G muxponder enables operators to achieve bandwidth efficiency in applications such as public, private or hybrid cloud, web hosting services, high-performance computing and more.

MRV’s OptiDriver optical transport platform is a compact, flexible and power-efficient portfolio of interconnect solutions. The OptiDriver muxponder offers fully pluggable interfaces that can host two 40G QSPF+, ten 10G SFP+ and a 100G CFP uplink that supports short range, DWDM metro and long range coherent 100G optics. For customers with a large number of 10G services in their network, the muxponder is an efficient way to combine ten 10G services into a single 100G signal. For customers with a mix of 40G and 10G services, the muxponder can carry any mix of services without the need to pre-plan the network or replace hardware for different mixes.

The OptiDriver platform also now supports flexible reconfigurable optical add-drop multiplexers (ROADMs). This allows network operators to dynamically move individual groups of wavelengths around the network through software rather than hardware changes. The OptiDriver chassis will initially support a four degree ROADM for applications including simple ring/add-drop networks and more complicated optical mesh networks.

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Analysis and opinion
Analysis and opinion
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