PRODUCT

PacketLight Networks launches diagnostic monitor for fibre networks

PacketLight Networks has launched a new fibre optic diagnostic solution to consistently monitor signal quality and network faults in a single device. 

Delivering non-intrusive network visibility, the PL-1000D provides carriers, dark fibre providers and businesses with a tool for real-time network diagnostics and improved service level agreements (SLAs). It offers an optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR) and an optical spectrum analyser (OSA) integrated into a 1U box for minimal rack space and improved CAPEX and OPEX.

The PL-1000D also detects changes in the fibre characteristics, such as tapping, and works in combination with embedded Layer-1 encryption to protect data across the fibre. It can monitor up to eight fibre strands consecutively and operates standalone over dark fibre, lighted fibre, or a third party network without impacting network traffic. The device monitors the entire DWDM C-band spectrum and provides the optical spectrum, OSNR, and OTDR measurements of the fibre.

Koby Reshef, CEO of PacketLight Networks said: ‘The PL-1000D was developed as a response to high demand from our customers wanting a cost-effective solution for better network visibility and accurate monitoring of fibre signal and faults. We responded by delivering one device with OTDR and OSA functionality for constant non-intrusive network monitoring to reduce maintenance costs and detect issues prior to service degradation.’

www.packetlight.com

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